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Seven Essential ROTC Video Interview Techniques during COVID-19

Online Versus In-Person ROTC Interview

It is likely that for many ROTC applicants, the candidate interview will be conducted via videoconferencing technology such as Zoom or Skype rather than in person this year. This presents opportunities for those candidates who are prepared for their video interview and are able to leverage the one major advantage that videoconferencing has over an in-person interview. 

In this blog post, we’ll look at seven key tips a candidate should concentrate on as they prepare for their video interview. For more in-person tips, read our article on Five Best Tips to Ace the ROTC Interview

Tip #1: Leverage the fact that the interviewer is not present with you to have your talking points in front of you

What we teach our clients is to have a memorized a set of talking points–anticipating the usual interview questions the candidate will face. Here are examples of these questions:

Talking Point 1: Why do you want to be an officer (in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines…)?
Talking Point 2: What officer specialties are you interested in (in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines)?
Talking Point 3: What do you know about the ROTC program you are applying for?
Talking Point 4: Give me an example of a time you have led others successfully to accomplish a task or a mission?
Talking Point 5: Tell me about a time that was difficult for you? How did you persevere and what did you learn?
Talking Point 6: Tell me about a time where you had an ethical challenge? How did you deal with it?
Talking Point 7: What questions do you have of me the interviewer?

The idea here is to have these talking points on 3×5 cards around the computer webcam so you can refer to them during the interview. This is the number one way you can leverage the advantage of a video interview vs. an in-person interview. See the picture below to get an idea of this setup.

photo of notecards showing how to succeed during online ROTC interview tips during COVID-19

How to set up talking points for your online ROTC interview

Tip #2: Master the Technology Before Your ROTC Interview

You should always practice your tech and set up ahead of time with others. Check the following when you do your practice set up:

  • Practice with the specific videoconferencing program you will use for the interview (i.e. Zoom, Skype, Go To Meeting)Check that your webcam is working
  • Check that your audio is working. Avoid earbuds or headphones if possible as it looks unnatural.
  • If possible, plug the internet directly into your computer via LAN cable rather than using WIFI. 
  • Close unnecessary programs on your computer to save memory.

Tip #3: Looking directly into the videocam (unless you are looking at your talking points!)

It sounds counterintuitive, but it is most important that the interviewer see you clearly, not the other way around. This means you need to look at and talk to the video camera rather than the image of the interviewer on your computer.

Tip #4: Eliminate all Distractions during your ROTC Interview

There is nothing more annoying to interviewers than being interrupted in the middle of the interview by another person or animal or a sound. Make sure you:

  • Let your family members and friends know not to disturb you.
  • Banish all pets from your conferencing area
  • Set all phones or devices to silent
  • Ensure all audible alerts on your computer are set to silent

Tip #5: Find a neutral background and check your lighting

A professional background is absolutely crucial to master. A bedroom with a sloppy bed, a home office full of clutter, people walking in the back of your camera are all signs that you are unprofessional, but it also distracts the interviewer.  Do not use a virtual background as it tends to distort your image and can take up a lot of bandwidth.  

As far as lighting, adjust lights in the room. If dark or dim, bring in an extra lamp to brighten the space.

Tip #6: Dress for Success

Just like you would for an in-person interview, make sure you dress for success but follow these additional rules:

  • Avoid bright colors or patterns and opt for softer colors instead
  • If you wear glasses, adjust the lighting to reduce glare
  • Wear professional pants or skirt in case you need to stand up for any reason

Tip #7: Master Interview Body Language

See Tip #3- stare directly into the videocam!

Convey optimism in your body language. Sit in your chair with your back straight and your shoulders open. Use hand gestures when appropriate and keep your movements close to your body. Avoid fidgeting or letting your gaze drift too far from the webcam.

Bottom line – prepare for your video interview

Candidates who normally do well on an in-person interview may do poorly on a video interview if they do not prepare adequately. Given that many applicants have never interviewed via video, practicing these techniques and being prepared can make a big difference. If you follow the advice presented here, you can be that much closer to a ROTC scholarship. We wish you the best of luck on your video interviews this year!

Seven Essential ROTC Video Interview Techniques during COVID-192020-08-26T17:16:31+00:00

Top Nine Questions to Ask (and Avoid Asking) at an ROTC Interview

Many candidates in preparing for their ROTC interview concentrate rightfully so on what questions will be posed to them by the interviewer.   We have talked about how to prepare for the interview as well as some of the types of questions which will be asked in previous posts.

At the end of most of these interviews, the interviewer will ask if the candidate has any questions of him or her.  This presents you the opportunity to ask excellent questions which ensures the interview ends on a high note.  Even if your interview did not go as well as planned, having great questions can help save an interview or turn around one that wasn’t going as well.

So, what some great questions to ask (and not to ask)?   We’ll first list five great questions to ask and why they are fantastic and then will follow up with four question to avoid.

 

Great Question 1:

What are the things I can do from now until I come onto campus in the fall to better prepare myself to be an ROTC cadet in the program?

 

Why this is great:

First, it signals your intent to become a cadet and that you will be working over the next six to eight months into become even more prepared.   One of the biggest issues ROTC cadre have when cadets come onto campus is that they are out of shape and cannot pass the physical fitness test and/or are overweight.  By signaling that you will be hard at work preparing for the fall, it shows your interest and well as intent to enroll and succeed.

 

 

Great Question 2:

Can you tell me about how the ROTC order of merit or ranking works to determine what specialty you receive?  I want to be a military intelligence officer…. a pilot…..a submariner.

 

Why this is great:

Again, it shows that you are planning to enroll in ROTC.  Also, that you have researched the specialties within the military service and have an idea of what you want to do.   ROTC order of merit is always on the mind of cadets in these programs and asking for an explanation of this process shows you know what is important to a cadet.   It shows your overall knowledge.

 

 

Great Question 3:

I am very interested in summer training opportunities that ROTC provides.    Can you tell me about some of these schools or trainings I can attend over the summer while I am out of school?

 

Why this is great:

Summer training is where ROTC cadets and midshipmen get their most dynamic and in depth training without the distractions of school.  Many of these opportunities are volunteer in nature and given only to the best ROTC students.  By showing interest, you impress upon the interviewers that you want to be a top person in the program and go beyond the minimum training requirements.

 

 

Great Question 4:

What additional opportunities to do you have in ROTC outside of the mandatory classes and trainings?  I have heard of your drill team…Ranger Challenge.. ect.

 

Why this is great:

 

Similar to Question 3, it shows you want to go beyond the minimum and you will be involved and a standout ROTC student.   Sometimes ROTC have a hard time filling their drill teams and other teams outside of the normal required activities.  By showing interest in these “extra” programs, it shows that you will be a person who they will be able to count on to go the additional mile.

 

 

Great Question 5:

What are some of the challenges in balancing my time in ROTC with academics?   I want to really get involved in ROTC but also understand that doing well academically is important.

 

Why this is great:

 

Shows you understand the number one challenge of ROTC students—balancing academics and ROTC.  Obtaining a good GPA is important for keeping your scholarship but also ranking well on the order of merit—so you must find a way to be an excellent ROTC cadet/midshipman and a student.

 

 

Questions to Avoid.

 

While there are a number of great questions to ask at an ROTC interview, there are also some questions to specifically avoid at the official interview.   First, saying you have no questions at the end of the interview indicates that you are not curious or that you are uninterested in ROTC!    Moreover, asked a poor question can ruin an otherwise good interview or if the interview was poor, put the “nail in the coffin” of your chances for a scholarship.  Generally,     any question which indicates that you will be doing the minimum or perhaps applying for the scholarship for the money and benefits rather than to serve and lead should be avoided.   Here are some examples of questions to avoid:

 

 

Poor Question 6:

How long would I have to serve in the military after graduation?

 

Why this is poor:

 

While a valid question on the surface, this question may indicate that you are looking at doing the minimum after you graduate and become an officer.  While your interviewer understands that many officers only do the required amount of service time, indicating so up front can prejudice your chances and indicate lack of desire for military service.

 

 

Poor Question 7:

How much does the scholarship pay for?  What do I get with the scholarship?

 

Why this is poor:

 

Again, indicates that you are concentrating on the money and what the ROTC scholarship will give you rather than what you will give to the ROTC and the military.

 

 

Poor Question 8:

Will I deploy to a combat zone if I become an officer?

 

Why is is poor:

 

Of course, you are going to be put in harms way as an officer.   First, this shows that you don’t know what the mission of the military is.  Second, it shows to a degree that you are valuing your own concerns over the larger military mission and hints at selfishness.

 

 

Poor Question 9:

What happens if I decide to drop out of ROTC after the first year?   Do I have to repay my scholarship?

 

Why this is poor:

 

Self explanatory–but one of the main things that ROTC interviewers are looking out for is candidate lack of persistence.  Will he/she stick it out for the entire time?   Is he/she in it just for the scholarship and the money?   What is the candidate’s motivation for the scholarship?  At a high-priced private school, a candidate dropping out after the first year normally does not need to repay the scholarship.  That candidate who drops out, costs ROTC upwards of $50,000/year.   A high cost to the military for a candidate who never intended to complete the program in the first place!

 

 

Final Thoughts:

 

Having good questions to ask your interviewer at the ROTC interview is essential to having a great interview.  It can be the icing on the cake of a great session or help save an interview that did not go as well as planned.  Conversely, avoiding poor questions can serve not to damage your chances.   Plan your questions ahead of time!   Good luck in your interview and for your desire to serve as an officer in the military.

 

 

 

Need help with the ROTC scholarship process and interview?  We help high school students win these scholarships and have over a 90% success rate.  We’d love to hear from you!

 

Top Nine Questions to Ask (and Avoid Asking) at an ROTC Interview2020-08-04T16:09:57+00:00

Does ROTC Increase Your Chances of Getting into College?

Students often wonder when they are applying for college and plan to take ROTC in college if strongly mentioning ROTC in their essays or interviews will increase their chances of getting into the college or university of their choice.

It often depends!

Our answer is: it often depends on the college or university they are applying to and how important ROTC is to the school.

How you can determine if the school supports ROTC

You can get a very good idea of how vital ROTC is to a college in how they support ROTC students financially on campus.   This is mainly shown through incentives that various colleges give to ROTC scholarship students who are on campus.  This is primarily room and board grants.   By providing free room and board to their scholarship winners, these colleges are putting their “money where their mouth is” in showing tangible support to their ROTC students.   To get an idea of what incentives these colleges give, you look up various programs at this link.

Once you know the college strongly supports ROTC, by all means, make that a central part of your essays and interview.   It will likely give you a boost in admission even if you don’t win an ROTC scholarship or come onto campus as a non-scholarship cadet simply participating in ROTC.

Use an ROTC scholarship as leverage

If you receive an ROTC scholarship off of a selection board BEFORE you receive admission to the college or university, this can be used as powerful leverage to gain admission, especially if the ROTC program is willing to advocate for you.   Our founder was the Army ROTC Professor of Military Science at Claremont McKenna College.  At CMC, he would work with the admissions office to work to get scholarship recipients into CMC.  Given how difficult it is to get into that particular school, any sort of advocacy often meant the difference between acceptance and a waitlist or rejection.

Note that many schools do not give preference to ROTC scholarship applicants.   The Ivy League Schools as well as schools such as Georgetown are examples.  The only way you can know if the school will give preference to scholarship recipients is to talk to that ROTC program and ask.

So, does ROTC increase your chances of getting into college?

Bottom line:   Saying you will participate or having an ROTC scholarship in hand will enhance your admission to schools that strongly support ROTC on their campuses.  The only way to know this is to do your research and ask the specific ROTC program you are interested in attending.

 

Need help with the ROTC scholarship process?  We help high school students win these scholarships and have over a 90% success rate.  We’d love to hear from you!

Does ROTC Increase Your Chances of Getting into College?2020-09-15T16:53:26+00:00

What are My Chances of Getting or Winning an ROTC Scholarship?

This is a common question we hear when candidates contact us. Our answer is always– “it depends”–because the criteria for Army, Navy, Navy-Marine Corps Option, and Air Force ROTCs are different in a number of ways.   This post will talk about each ROTC program and the most important elements to consider in order to determine your chances of success.

Army ROTC

Is probably the “easiest” scholarship to win.

Army ROTC ranks applicants on a 1400 point scale using the following weights:

Area of Consideration Points
College Board Scores 250
Scholar, Athletics and Leadership 200
Interview 200
Selection Board Score 350
Civilian Background Experience Form (CBEF) 250
Physical Fitness Test 150
Total Points 1400

There is not much variation between candidates in Scholar, Athletics and Leadership, the CBEF, or the Physical Fitness test.

Most important criteria for Army ROTC:

Score above 1200 SAT combined or above a 24 ACT composite.  Army ROTC superscores the test so there is no penalty to retake the test.

Do well on the interview because it has points allotted to it and is also the most important part of the Selection Board Score.

Bottom Line:   Score above 1200 on the SAT or 24 ACT and have a good interview and you should at a minimum win a 3-year Army ROTC Scholarship.

Air Force ROTC

Probably the second “easiest” scholarship to win.

Air Force ROTC ranks applicants on a 1000 point scale using the following weights:

Area of Consideration Points
Interview  450
Unweighted GPA  200
SATe (SAT/ACT)  300
Physical Fitness Assessment    50
Total Points 1000

Most important criteria for Air Force ROTC:

The interview is by far the most important area to do well on for Air Force ROTC.  You won’t win a scholarship if you have a bad interview.

Your goal for the SAT is to score above 1300 combined or above a 27 ACT composite.  Air Force ROTC is best sitting and NOT superscored.

If you don’t designate a major in the following areas, it is unlikely you will receive a scholarship:

  • Aeronautical Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Architectural Engineering
  • Architecture
  • Astronautical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Meteorological/Atmospheric Science
  • Nuclear Engineering
  • Nuclear Physics
  • Operations Research
  • Physics

Bottom line:

Prepare extensively for the interview and work to score over 1300/27 composite best sitting.  Designate a “highly desired” major.

Navy ROTC

This is a more difficult scholarship to obtain than the Army and Air Force Scholarship.

The way Navy ROTC chooses scholarship winners is opaque and there is not a point total that they use.   All Navy ROTC winners are chosen by an officer board that evaluates the scholar, athlete, leader credentials of each candidate.

There seems to be little variation for athlete or leader credentials for Navy ROTC.

Most important criteria for Navy ROTC:

Score a 700 or above on the Math SAT.  Navy ROTC superscores the test.

Designate either a Tier I or Tier II Academic Major:

Tier I:

  • Aerospace
  • Aeronautical
  • Astronautical Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Naval Architecture & Marine/Naval Engineering
  • Nuclear Engineering
  • Ocean Engineering
  • Systems Engineering

Tier II:

  • Agricultural/Biological Engineering & Bioengineering
  • Architectural Engineering/Architectural Engineering Technologies
  • Astrophysics Biochemistry
  • Biophysics & Molecular Biology
  • Biomathematics & Bioinformatics Biomedical/Medical Engineering
  • Biotechnology Cell/Cellular Biology & Anatomical Sciences
  • Ceramic Sciences & Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Programming
  • Computer Science/Info. Tech.
  • Construction Engineering
  • Electronics & Comm. Engineering
  • Engineering Mechanics
  • Engineering
  • Physics
  • Engineering Science
  • General Engineering
  • General Science
  • Industrial Engineering
  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Materials Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Metallurgical Engineering
  • Microbiological Sciences and Immunology
  • Mining & Mineral Engineering Nuclear & Industrial Radiologic Technology
  • Oceanography
  • Petroleum Engineering
  • Pharmacology & Toxicology
  • Physics
  • Physiology, Pathology & Related Sciences
  • Polymer/Plastics Engineering
  • Quantitative Economics
  • Statistics
  • Textile Sciences & Engineering

Bottom line:  Score a 700 SAT or above on Math and designate a Tier I or II major.

Navy ROTC- Marine Corps Option

By far the hardest scholarship to obtain because there are so few of them and it is so personalized.  However, that can be an advantage to those candidates who have the motivation (and time) to work towards this scholarship.

Like Navy ROTC, the process is opaque and there is not a point total that they use.   The Marine Corps awards scholarships by Recruiting District so it is important to have a good reputation and be known within your District.  The following is a map of the districts:

You must be a solid performer with very good SAT/ACT Scores (goal is above 1300 SAT/27 ACT), with a good high school GPA.   Navy ROTC-Marine Corps option is best sitting.

Most important criteria for Navy ROTC- Marine Corps Option:

Participate actively in physical fitness and other sessions with the local Marine Corps recruiting office in your area within your district.  Be known, be seen.

Score above 265 on the Marine Corps Fitness Test.  Retake it in order to score higher.

As you can see, there are different standards and criteria in order to win a scholarship.   We have boiled this down to the bare essentials so you have an idea if you have a chance of winning a scholarship.  We wish you the best of luck in your quest to become a military officer!

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships. Please take a look at our services for more information. We also have books on ROTC Scholarships as well as West Point admissions on Amazon!

Interested in Service Academies too?

Did you know we also help students win Service Academy appointments? Check out our sister site: Gain Service Academy Admission.
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What are My Chances of Getting or Winning an ROTC Scholarship?2020-09-18T03:17:05+00:00

Navy ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary

Winning Navy ROTC Essay Examples

The following are winning four-year scholarship essays from Navy ROTC and Navy ROTC-Marine Corps option applicants we have worked within the past at ROTC Consulting. These also apply to Navy ROTC because the prompts are the same. We will provide commentary at the end of each essay as to why each of these Navy ROTC essay examples is effective.

Winning Navy ROTC Essay #1

Prompt:

Discuss your reasons for wanting to become a Marine Officer. Specifically, comment on leadership positions you’ve held, the challenges you have faced and the lessons you have learned.

Winning Answer:

My desire to become an officer in the Marine Corps stems from my passion for leadership, athletic merit, community service, and my country. These attributes will greatly assist me on my quest to earn the title of Marine officer.

In order to make that statement, I needed to better understand what life would be like as a ROTC midshipman and future Marine lieutenant. I had an action plan to find out more. I visited the Texas A&M Naval ROTC and talked to midshipmen and the officer staff about what it takes to be a midshipman. I have spoken to several commissioned officers about my chosen career as a Marine aviation officer and learned about the responsibility and standards that will be demanded of me leading enlisted Marines. It is an awesome responsibility that begins with my enrollment in the Naval ROTC

I embrace leadership. For two years I have been the student leader for my school’s design program. My responsibilities included developing solutions to intricate problems, crafting enhanced ways of teaching subjects for teachers, and mentoring younger students on the proper use of tools and safety. This upcoming year I will be a part of the inaugural community-based design class in which we will identify and solve problems in our community.

Sports have been an integral part of my life. From a state-ranked ten-year-old swimmer to a three-time tennis state champion at 17, I have matured into a solid athlete but also a strong teammate and leader. As the cross-country team captain, my goal was not only to form a bond but also to succeed as a team. In my second year as the team captain, I am working to set an example of strong work ethic and to create an atmosphere of camaraderie. I understand the importance the Marine Corps places on being physically fit. As an officer, you must set the example and physical fitness excellence is one way to demonstrate this.

Giving back to my community has become important. Teaching kids with autism how to play tennis has been extremely fulfilling, because it gives them the chance to be athletes who are defined by their skill and not by their condition. I have also found great joy in teaching tennis to younger kids and introducing them to the sport that has given back to me. I believe serving my community for its betterment has made a lasting impact on me and instilled the true value of service to others.

Patriotism and loyalty are two traits that describe my love of this country My whole life I have felt extremely lucky to have been raised and given a great education in this amazing country. I would like to put my education and leadership skills to use in the best way possible, defending this great nation while helping to lead the world’s premier fighting force.

Commentary on why this essay is successful:

Notice that this essay is a combination of showing things that he did to learn more about being both a cadet and an officer in the United States Navy as well as what the candidate did in high school that applies to the question.

In our opinion, the first part of the essay, namely, demonstrating what you know about the Navy or Marine Corps, in the more important part of the essay. This can be demonstrated by letting Navy ROTC know what research you did on the internet, who you talked to (both cadets/midshipmen and officers) and especially what things you did to visit ROTC programs and actual Navy or Marine Corps units (such as Navy or Marine Corps Reserve Units) to talk with both officers and noncommissioned officers to learn the duties and responsibilities of a lieutenant or ensign.

In addition, did you take the time to visit a Navy ROTC program? If so, what did you learn? Are you ready for the challenges of Navy ROTC? Tell the board members that you took the time to visit and learn more about Navy ROTC and are excited about being a midshipmen/cadet.

Winning Navy ROTC Essay #2

Prompt:
How might your background and experiences enhance the U.S. Marine Corps?

Winning Answer:

My experiences in leadership and community service have provided a strong foundation for me to build off of and further develop as a midshipman and future officer in the United States Marine Corps. Throughout high school I have had valuable leadership opportunities in the classroom, on athletic teams, in church, and in my community.

For the past two years, I have been the student leader in my school’s design program using my problem-solving abilities and organizational skills to guide other students to success in the classroom. Junior year I became the captain of the boys varsity cross country team. I take this honor seriously and work to set an example by having a strong work ethic and a positive attitude for the team. My experience as a leader, coupled with the training I would receive as a midshipman, will help make me a strong future leader of Marines.

My commitment to service is something that I take great pride in. It is not the quantity of community service hours I have, but the quality of service. I believe that the time you do spend must be applied to something meaningful to better the community. To truly make a difference you also have to show passion in your service. I have volunteered every summer with my church to help with their vacation bible school. I have helped with a dog rescue, and I have rung the bell for the Salvation Army. However, what fulfills me the most is volunteering at a weekly tennis clinic for children with autism as well as a tournament for veterans. I have worked closely with the program director to help plan and make each event successful. Working with people who have both mental and physical challenges and seeing them succeed is very rewarding. I understand that selfless service and a servant’s heart are important attributes of Maine officers and I believe my experiences will prepare me to be a better Marine officer.

Commentary on why this essay is successful:

This is where you provide Navy ROTC your “signature” accomplishments. The top three to four things you are most proud of. List each and then explain in a paragraph why this accomplish is significant. In this way, you highlight to the selection committee clearly what you are most proud of and what they need to pay attention to. This is where you get to “brag” about yourself.

Final Thoughts on Navy ROTC essays:

These essays are important to Navy ROTC. These winning ROTC essay examples highlight several things. Essay #1 needs to show what effort you put in to learn more about Navy ROTC and the duties and responsibilities of an ensign or lieutenant. Essay #2 is your signature accomplishments to demonstrate why you should be selected for a scholarship over someone else. Make sure you highlight only the most important things you have done.

If you do the above things, you are that much closer to winning a Navy ROTC Scholarship!

ROTC Scholarship Consulting provides assistance with your essays as well as other areas of the scholarship application. ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships. Please take a look at our services for more information.

Interested in Service Academies too?

Did you know we also help students win Service Academy appointments? Check out our sister site: Gain Service Academy Admission.
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Navy ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary2020-09-18T03:16:11+00:00

Army ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary

The following are winning four-year scholarship essays from Army ROTC applicants we have worked with in the past at ROTC Consulting. We will provide commentary at the end of each essay as to why each answer is effective. You can find our previous post about building a successful essay here.

Army ROTC Essay #1

Prompt:

Consider carefully, and then state below in the space provided why you wish to enroll in the Army ROTC Program. Indicate in your statement how you believe your own objectives in life are related to the education and training offered by Army ROTC and what a career obligation means to you.

Winning Answer:

I believe that American values and our way of life are worth fighting for. One of the finest ways one can demonstrate this commitment is by becoming an officer in the United States Army. This commitment is not something to be taken lightly and I needed to explore what the duties and responsibilities of both a cadet and a lieutenant were. I had a plan.

I visited the Somerset Army National Guard unit near my home in New Jersey. There, I was introduced to a group of officers, non-commissioned officers, and cadets. I learned from my visit that officers lead by example and need to take care of their soldiers. Non-commissioned officers are the “backbone” of the Army and it is important that new lieutenants learn from their sergeants. Since I am interested in the National Guard after I commission, they told me about the civilian jobs that I could pursue in the State Police or the FBI while I was in the National Guard. It was really inspirational to see how National Guard officers and enlisted both serve their community and the Nation.

On my visit to Army ROTC at Drexel University, I spoke to the PMS and what struck me was the importance for future leaders to become proficient in basic soldier skills and troop leading procedures. The ROOs at TCU and Wake Forest reinforced this message. I know that by mastering these tasks, I will be a successful lieutenant and the best leader I can be no matter what path I choose in life.

Once I become a lieutenant, I hope to deploy overseas. An important aspect is to understand the local culture in the execution of my duties as an officer. I hope that my intended major of international business helps me gain a deeper understanding of the people I will be interacting with overseas.

Overall, through my experience in visiting both a National Guard and several ROTC programs as well as from my current activities, I understand what it takes to be an Army officer and I am prepared for this challenge.

Commentary on what makes this essay successful:

Notice that this essay is not a rundown of what the candidate did in high school or a listing of achievements. This prompt is most effectively answered by showing things that you did to learn more about being both a cadet and an officer in the United States Army.

This can be demonstrated by letting Army ROTC know what research you did on the internet, who you talked to (both cadets and officers) and especially what things you did to visit ROTC programs and actual Army units (such as Army National Guard or Army Reserve Units) to talk with both officers and noncommissioned officers to learn the duties and responsibilities of a lieutenant.

In addition, did you take the time to visit an Army ROTC program? If so, what did you learn? Are you ready for the challenges of Army ROTC? Tell the board members that you took the time to visit and learn more about Army ROTC and are excited about being a cadet.

Army ROTC Essay #2

Prompt:

State below in the space provided how you spend your time in a typical week during the school year. For example, how many extra hours do you spend: at school, during homework, engaged in athletic activities, engaged in extracurricular activities (i.e. clubs), engaged in volunteer work, or other (explain).

Answer:

I am a very busy and focus driven individual. From the classroom to the athletic field I am constantly working to hone my skills.

Every day I am up early, whether I have a specific task or just looking to get a head start on the day. I arrive at school an hour early to get academic help, complete assignments, or just relax and get my mind right for the day. This is an important part of my routine.

During a normal day of school, I take countless notes, tests and quizzes as well as attend weekly club meetings. It is almost guaranteed that I will have at least two club meetings per week during break. Some days my lunchtime or study hall time is spent in a teacher’s classroom solidifying my understanding of the subject matter. After the academic day, my real day begins. I have 45 minutes in between my last class and athletic practice to do homework and see teachers. I utilize this time every day even if I don’t have questions in order to gain more insight from there instruction.

As the captain of the varsity cross country team and tennis team, I am tasked with always showing a positive attitude and setting the standard in regard to work ethic. I am responsible for keeping the team focused and working hard. Practice typically lasts for an hour and half depending on the intensity. After cross country, I head straight to tennis practice on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Although tennis practice is only three days a week, it is a year-round commitment for me. I am often on the courts on Tuesdays and Fridays as well when my schoolwork is manageable. My school days last until 7 pm, and then I get to go home.

When I get home and have showered and eaten dinner, I begin my homework and academic preparation for the next day. I often work on papers or projects at this time, and I always manage to spend time with my family. After I have completed everything I need for the next day, I get a good night’s rest and prepare to do it again.

Commentary on what makes this essay successful:

This essay is fairly standard, and it is important to let Army ROTC know that you are a dynamic individual who is busy doing a variety of activities that involve the range of scholar, athlete, leader activities. The more specific you can be about each of these areas, the stronger the essay.

Specifically avoid non-kinetic activities such as playing video games, TV watching, bystanding, or other events where you are not an active participant. Again, emphasize active scholar-athlete-leader events.

Army ROTC Essay #3

Prompt:

Please expand on any additional information outlining scholastic, athletic, and leadership achievements not otherwise annotated in the previous sections. Although you are not required to do so, you are highly encouraged to do so if applicable.

Answer:

Ronald Reagan Presidential Leadership Institute: I recently had the honor of being selected to attend his Institute. I learned that leadership can mean more than being a role model, it can also mean being an instrument of change. Attending the Institute gave me the chance to meet a leader of a non-profit focusing on preventing drug overdoses. I saw how one person could make a difference and started a chapter on my own high school campus. A lot of students start their encounters with drugs through medications they find at home. I am working with the Behavioral Health Department to obtain kits that neutralize medications. Maybe we can prevent a future tragedy.

Eagle Scout: I was a leader in several capacities. The most challenging was being a leader for a group of new scouts on a camping trip to Death Valley. It was pretty frustrating at first to get everyone to fulfill their jobs, but eventually I helped them understand that we had to work together to make things run smoothly. My Eagle Scout project gave me the chance to oversee a project from start to finish. I built a much-needed library in my temple and it was extremely fulfilling.

Captain of Varsity Lacrosse and Basketball Team: I have also served as a leader for my sports teams. I am proud to be a captain and I take my responsibility seriously. I know my actions have an impact on the other players and am more aware of the need to be a good role model. The most challenging part of being a student athlete is managing my time so I can give school and my sports teams my best effort. I have been named a Scholar Athlete several times which demonstrates that I can manage my time effectively.

Commentary on what makes this essay successful:

This is where you provide Army ROTC your “signature” accomplishments. The top three to four things you are most proud of. List each and then explain in a paragraph why this accomplishment is significant. In this way, you highlight to the selection committee clearly what you are most proud of and what they need to pay attention to. This is where you get to “brag” about yourself.

Final Thoughts on Army ROTC essays:

Essay #1 and Essay #3 are where you make your “money” sat the Army ROTC Scholarship Board. Essay #1 needs to show what effort you put in to learn more about Army ROTC and the duties and responsibilities of an Army lieutenant. Essay #3 is your signature accomplishments to demonstrate why you should be selected for a scholarship over someone else. Make sure you highlight only the most important things you have done.

If you do the above things, you are that much closer to winning an Army ROTC Scholarship!

ROTC Scholarship Consulting provides assistance with your essays as well as other areas of the scholarship application. ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships. Please take a look at our services for more information.

Interested in Service Academies too?

Did you know we also help students win Service Academy appointments? Check out our sister site: Gain Service Academy Admission.
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Army ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary2020-09-18T03:11:50+00:00

Five Reasons ROTC Scholarship Applicants Need to Join Civil Air Patrol

Learning to fly airplanes is one of the most ambitious career goals you can have today. Individuals who are 12-18 years old have an opportunity to make themselves, family, and, most importantly, the country proud.

After all, who doesn’t like the idea of saving lives and help usher a more era of peace and prosperity? Whether you are about to complete your high school or simply want to challenge yourself to strive for perfection, there is a multitude of reasons for ROTC scholarship applicants to join the Civil Air Patrol (CAP).

Besides, it is a chance to serve your community and acquire the leadership qualities that would inspire others. Here is an overview and essential five reasons to become a part of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) for ROTC scholarship applicants:

What is the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program?

It is a scholarship program that revolves around the Air Force and aerospace industry’s collaborative efforts to find the best pilots of the country. Contemporarily, there is a need for talented and skilled individuals who can understand the modern technological advancement and sophisticated aircraft navigations.

CAP is inherently a volunteer-based auxiliary program of the U.S. Air Force. The three key missions of the program are to educate cadets about the significance of space and aviation, humanitarian missions, and execute life-saving missions.

The 8-week long summer aviation program involves the participation of renowned universities across the U.S. Once you finish the CAP program, you receive Private Pilot’s Certification. The idea is to spark a sense of encouragement and inspiration among high school individuals to pursue aviation careers.

The aircraft rules are still the same, but you’d be surprised at the continuous evolution of civil aviation. Of course, the underlying goal is to help develop aspiring young individuals into responsible U.S. citizens and aerospace leaders through the Cadet Program.

What Can Applicants Expect in the Program?

That said, there are numerous organized elements cadets will have to face throughout the program. Primarily, the cadets can expect four essential elements throughout the training program. Step-by-step, cadets will be able to complete achievements and earn honors.

CEAP: Cadet Encampment Assistance Program

For cadets who are in their first or later year. It facilitates disadvantaged cadets who attend one week of encampment through coverage of uniform and tuition costs.

CTOP: Cadet Take-Off Program

For cadets who are in their second year or later. The aim is to encourage cadets to attend one week of Civil Air Patrol flight academy to have solo experience in a single-engine airplane or glider.

Cadet Wings

For cadets who are in their second or later years. Comparatively, it is more competitive because a merit-based scholarship program takes care of almost all expenses to help cadets become licensed pilots.

Cadet Lift

Also for cadets who are in their second or later years. It assists disadvantaged cadets with their travel and tuition costs through academy’s one-week career exploration initiative.

From Character to Fitness: What Applicants Will Learn

After cadets get the hang of the basic routine, they usually make Civil Air Patrol their main priority. Although friends and family back home matter, the programs evoke the long-term interests of the cadets. It means it asks applicants to give their best shot for the entirety of the program.

Ultimately, the goal is to help applicants learn what it means to have a code of honor, use leadership skills, being open to diversity, show enthusiasm, possess extensive knowledge, and form a regular exercise routine.

Character Development

Civil Air Patrol program challenges cadets to reform their core character values. And through those transformative character changes, cadets begin to understand the ethical issues and dynamics relevant to the new generation. For instance, CAP encourages CAP cadets to avoid drugs and influence others (i.e., communities and schools) to do the same.

Improve Resilience

CAP could not be more ideal where applicants can improve their self-esteem and show resilience. In fact, it is one of the fundamental aspects of a cadet’s natural life. The program supports cadets to dive into new experiences and emerge victorious.

Cadets don’t necessarily “have to” succeed at every task. Instead, it is the relentless approach that influences cadets’ impulses. It is okay to make mistakes so long as cadets learn valuable lessons.

Status and Commitment

When young adults find a purpose and commit wholeheartedly, it improves their communication skills and status. Whether its commitment to prepare uniforms or follow a command chain obediently, everything matters.

Change Priorities

Cadets need to maintain above average or satisfactory progress throughout their high school. The participation of cadet tasks results in rewards through good grades and responsible behavior.

Physical Fitness

Civil Air Patrol encourages cadets to make regular exercise their lifelong habit. However, CAP understands it is not a habit that cadets can form in a single night. In fact, it takes a certain degree of fitness preparation through hiking, volleyball, calisthenics, and other physical competitive activities.

Five Reasons to Join the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program

1.    Enhance Military Propensity to Obtain an ROTC Scholarship or Service Academy Appointment

One of the reasons applicants join CAP is to improve their military propensity to avail ROTC scholarship or SAP. The notion of getting into a Military Service Academy can be overwhelming for anyone. In addition, cadets who rank higher in CAP program can have a better pay grade after enlistment in the Air Force.

So long as you have the interest to attend one of the service academies after completing high school, the CAP cadet program is perfect to become more competitive for admission into an academy of your preference.

It is imperative to understand that at least 10% of new cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy are former CAP cadets. And if you are not even searching for a service academy, other reputable colleges with ROTC programs take applicants who have prior experience in the CAP seriously.

2.    Interact with the Military and Learn its Customs and Courtesies

Yes, CAP cadet programs allow applicants to meet mayors, senators, congressmen, managers, and generals of different countries. You can even become an escort to spend some time with these influential people.

Furthermore, you can talk about their military experiences and values for more enlightened. The truth is, joining CAP comes with a lot of exciting perks for cadets. It is an excellent opportunity for new Gen Z that previous generations never had.

3.    Learn Field Craft and Navigation by Participating in CAP Rescue, Search Training, and Missions

Ordinarily, CAP deploys more than 95% of the Search & Rescue missions in the U.S. And with enough quality training, you can work alongside military personnel and law enforcement agencies to save lives of people who are in dire need.

There is a good chance you haven’t had the chance as a teenager to engage in such activities. Fortunately, you do have a distinct opportunity to learn how a mission base takes care of operational activities. For instance, you can walk into forests and look for clues of lost individuals.

You will be using modern search techniques and tools. Once you learn the uses and benefits of professional military-grade tools, you will feel a sense of accomplishment and pride. It is your service quality and collective knowledge of these skills that can save more lives than you can imagine.

In addition, volunteer pilots also love to share their passion for flying with new cadets. It is a great way to have first-hand flight experience. Remember, Civil Air Patrol’s pilots have a license from the FAA that involves specific syllabus regulations for every flight. The idea is to make sure the safety of the flight. Cadets, on the other hand, might also receive free orientation flights in a military-grade aircraft.

4.    Practice Military Leadership While in High School

CAP allows cadets to learn military-level leadership skills in a classroom setting. Experienced mentors can demonstrate hands-on leadership learning qualities. Once cadets naturally follow orders and progress in their goals, it opens up new opportunities to lead a small team, think independently, or manage projects on your own to develop better leadership abilities as you mature into adult life.

For instance, one-week of the Encampment period allows cadets to immerse into a new regiment atmosphere where they could heighten their leadership skills. It all comes down to challenging yourself to solve obstacles.

5.    Become More Physically Fit in Preparation for ROTC and Academy Physical Fitness Tests

One of the first things you learn from CAP’s cadet program is self-discipline. It is more than just a habit, but a representation of core values that shape your performance. With a better-disciplined personality, you can serve the communities better.

In fact, even without an aerospace career, you will benefit from good physical fitness habits for the rest of your life. And the same instilled discipline helps you flourish physically and achieve personal growth.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who can apply for the CAP cadet program?

Cadets enrolled in Junior ROTC Air Force programs with a GPA of 3.0 can apply. However, cadets need to have a good standing in their group, partake in an Air Force aviation-related aptitude test, and get the school’s endorsement that serves as a focus of interest in aviation. The objective is to make sure the applicant has sufficient interest and would not quit under tough circumstances

How participation of universities works?

Partner universities provide AABI or Aviation Accreditation Board International accreditation. You can locate FAA flight programs throughout the U.S. The goal of the AFJROTC is to offer as many scholarships as possible to applicants to attend the cadet program. The program does not necessarily have to be a summer one. Instead, each university has different management styles. Nonetheless, you can expect similar academic standards from all universities.

Are there any special measures in place to supervise and protect minors?

Although each program’s guidelines and rules may vary, there are certain measures universities take beforehand to ensure the well-being of the minor applicants. In fact, most of the universities also make sure of the accountability factors throughout the participation. Whether it is flight instructions, transportation, travel, classroom instructions, or counsel in housing, there is always supervision.

Is there an adult or senior membership in the CAP program?

Civil Air Patrol is always in need of talented and skilled volunteers who want to help new cadets. Whether you want you to drive, chaperone, or perform other minimal tasks, the door is always open. However, if you want to join CAP in a full capacity, you should consider a senior membership.

Conclusion: A Chance to Be in the Spotlight!

CAP candidates gain more optimism to have an exacting future. The Civil Air Patrol’s flight and a college scholarship is an experience of a lifetime. CAP cadets mainly develop an ability to become responsible citizens at an early age.

Today’s young aspirational CAP cadets are tomorrow’s aerospace champions. What is interesting is that CAP sparks the love of aviation cadets possess. It is a unique opportunity for cadets to understand and experience first-hand flight in an aircraft.

You can make new friends from all over the U.S. In addition, meeting policy makers and leaders will help you find a new perspective. Once you understand the intricate details of a CAP aircraft through rigorous training, you can realize your full potential. After joining the CAP as a cadet, you can explore various STEM careers.

If you want to find out more information, listen to the podcast for an insightful experience of Lt. Col John Lierenz, Head of Cadet Programs for Delaware Wing.

 

Five Reasons ROTC Scholarship Applicants Need to Join Civil Air Patrol2020-08-04T16:20:01+00:00

Top 5 Things to Consider When Applying for an Army ROTC Nursing Scholarship

Congratulations! You are thinking about an Army Nursing ROTC scholarship, which is a very admirable and exciting pursuit. Nursing students who are also Army ROTC cadets are exceptionally well trained, and benefit from one-on-one mentorship and real-world experience that you may not find in nursing school alone. Additionally, enrolling in Army ROTC not only helps you build your nursing skills, but it also allows you to enhance your personal growth through leadership training and critical thinking exercises. Depending on which school you attend, you may also qualify for significant financial assistance as a nursing student within the Army ROTC. Choosing the best school for your personal, professional, and financial needs as a prospective Army Nursing ROTC student is critical, and there are multiple different factors you should consider before making a decision. In this article, we detail the five most important things that you should think about before joining an Army Nursing ROTC Program. Scroll through the outline and article below to get more information on how to make the best choice for you.

  • Consider whether you want to go to a public school or a private school

One of the primary decisions that you will have to make when deciding where to attend school is whether you want to go to private school or public school. There are benefits and drawbacks to each choice, and the important thing is having a comprehensive understanding of each so that you can make the decision that is best for you.

One benefit of a private school Army ROTC nursing education is that private schools typically have more freedom to provide you with financial support than public schools. For example, many private schools have ROTC programs that can pay room and board, and in fact, they may also support payment for first year tuition on a three year scholarship. The level of support that each school provides is unique for each institution, and you should talk to both the ROTC program and the financial aid department at your schools of interest to get more information.

Another benefit of private schools is that if you have already received a scholarship from the ROTC program at your school of interest, your ROTC program can advocate for you with the admissions department to help you gain admissions to that college or university. It is rare for public schools to have the same latitude to provide an admissions advantage.

Additionally, private schools generally have a lower student to faculty ratio, which affords you more individualized attention. Given the rigor of many collegiate nursing programs, and the high demands of ROTC, having this extra academic support has the potential to make a huge difference in terms of your academic success.

Lastly, private schools have a vested interest in ensuring that you graduate within the typical four-year college timeline. In public schools, there is generally less concern for making sure that you graduate on time, and this can pose problems for several reasons. The first is that, if you have scholarships that you attend school on, those will typically run out at the conclusion of the traditional four-year college period. Therefore, you may find yourself in a situation where you do not have the financial support that you have previously had. This is a particularly pressing problem for Army ROTC nursing students in particular, as there is potential for ROTC requirements to conflict with required clinical courses. It is important to make sure that your department and college are willing to work with you in scheduling your classes, otherwise you may find yourself delayed by six months or more as you wait to graduate. This can have a cascading effect on your career plan, and may result in you having to take a whole extra year off before you can finally get commissioned after graduating. This issue is differentially prevalent depending on which school you are looking at, so make sure you speak with either other students in your program or admissions and ROTC officers about their experiences with timely graduation.

However, public schools are not all bad, and certainly they offer excellent educational experiences, and typically at a lower price than private schools. They may also afford more competitive athletic experiences if you happen to enjoy either playing or watching sports. Additionally, public schools are typically much larger than private schools, and as a result may have a wider variety of classes and programs to involve yourself in, as well as a generally greater diversity of experiences.

Additionally, many public schools do provide certain financial incentives and benefits for their ROTC students. For example, many schools in the U.S. provide in-state benefits for out-of-state students attending their school, which can significantly lower tuition if you have to pay for the first year.  Additionally, if for some reason you have to drop out of ROTC, it will be easier to stay in school at a public college or university rather than stay and pay full tuition at a private school.

  • Determine what types of scholarships you would be eligible for, and what the differences between them are

Another major factor for you to consider when deciding which school to attend is finding out which scholarships that you would be eligible for, and what the differences between them are. Nursing majors compete for 2, 3, or 4-year scholarships, and the criteria for these scholarships are as follows:

  • You must be a United States citizen at the time of your application
  • You must be a high school graduate with a minimum of a 3.0 GPA
  • You must have an SAT score of 1050 or an ACT score of 21
  • You must be physically fit and medically qualified to serve
  • You must be under 31 years of age on June 30th of the year you graduate from college
  • You must have good moral character

Each of these scholarships provides full tuition, up $1200 per year for books, a monthly tax-free stipend during the school year of $424.

If you receive an Army ROTC Nurse Scholarship, you will also receive extensive benefits, including: free access to NCLEX-RN review courses, prepaid NCLEX-RN exam fees, guaranteed nursing position upon graduation, prepaid malpractice insurance, prepaid immunizations, and finally prepaid nursing and uniform supplies. However, there a multitude of different types of scholarships available for nursing students in Army ROTC, which vary in terms of their level of support.

 

  • Understand what the daily life of a nursing student in ROTC is like and visit the school to get a sense for the service atmosphere in your prospective cadre

In addition to considering schools based on whether they are public or private, and with respect to their available financial support and scholarship funds, it is also critical to make sure that you understand what the daily life of a nursing student at your prospective school is like. Specifically, it is important to visit the school and get a sense for the service atmosphere within your prospective cadre, and throughout the university as a whole. For example, some schools may be more receptive and supportive of their ROTC students, and will accommodate your needs more readily than others. It is important to be aware of this, as you will likely encounter conflicts between your ROTC demands and your nursing program demands as you progress through school.

This is particularly relevant in your MS-3 and MS-4 years, which tend to have heightened ROTC demands that arise concurrently with an increase in nursing clinicals that you must attend. Making sure that you speak directly with both your ROTC program leaders and department heads within the nursing program can help you mitigate potential conflict, but you should reach out prior to making your decision to assess how likely it is that the school will be able to support you in your goal of a timely graduation as you manage the competing demands of ROTC and nursing.

Another excellent resource you may consider is current nursing students at your school of interest who are already undergoing the challenges of managing both programs. They will provide you with a realistic understanding of what balancing the two is actually like, and will likely be able to provide you with insider knowledge that you wouldn’t get from merely speaking to the department. Speaking to current Army ROTC nursing students is also important if you would like to be at a school where there are many students who are in the same boat as you, that is, if you want to make sure that you are not the only one in your program trying to do both.

  • Be prepared to make the most of your summers

As an Army ROTC nursing student, you should be prepared to be very busy for much of the academic year. Often, you will probably feel like there is not enough time to do everything that you want to, or even everything that you need to. This applies to both ROTC demands, schoolwork demands, and physical and personal demands. Therefore, you should be prepared to strongly consider using your summers as a time to catch up and get ahead- this will help lighten your load during the school year and make it more likely that you can graduate on time.

There are several popular ways that current nursing students have utilized their summers, and you should be prepared to at least consider these paths. The first method is using your summer to do the Nurse Summer Training Program offered through the ROTC. This program is a 3-4 week clinical elective that is popular among nurse cadets. While it is entirely voluntary, it provides valuable hands on experience under the direct supervision of a preceptor- an Army Nurse Corps officer who works with you one-on-one. This elective is conducted at Army hospitals across the U.S, Germany, and Korea, and you could be stationed in any of these locations. Typically, nursing students who are between their junior and senior years of college will attend this camp.

For younger students, the summer can be a great time to knock out some basic general education courses that are a required component of the major. For example, you may take microbiology or human anatomy during the summer to free up some of your schedule space during the school year for other necessary classes, or to create more time to attend to your ROTC or personal demands.

Lastly, as physical fitness is a required component of being part of the Army ROTC, you should be perennially prepared to maintain your physical training during the summer period, not just when you are with your cadre at school. This will help promote well-being of the mind and body, while also ensuring that you arrive back at school in great shape for the fall.

  • Ensure that you like the school as a whole entity

Lastly, as with any college search, make sure that you like the school as a whole. While it is unlikely, there are potential scenarios where you may not be able or willing to complete your ROTC or nursing training. Whether through injury, illness, or because your interests or passions have changed, you may find that you are taking a different path than you previously planned. Life is anything but straightforward, and you should make sure to account for this reality by choosing a school that you will like and enjoy attending, whether you decide to continue with ROTC and nursing or not.

 

Again, congratulations on considering the Army ROTC Nursing Option

Being an Army nurse has many benefits associated with it, including competitive initial annual pay and excellent benefits packages. More importantly, being an Army nurse offers you the opportunity to make a powerful positive impact on the world, and have a lifechanging effect on the lives of those you serve.

 

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win Army ROTC Scholarships.  Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

 

Top 5 Things to Consider When Applying for an Army ROTC Nursing Scholarship2020-08-09T16:30:40+00:00

2020-2021 Navy ROTC Marine Corps Option Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines

Hi Everyone,

The following are the 2020-2021 Board Dates for Navy ROTC- Marine Corps Option scholarship.  As per previous years, they run two boards, one in November and the other in March.

The SAT/ACT is still required for a completed packet.   Scores must be sent to NROTC Test Code 0565.

The Portal Opened on April 1, 2020.

The application deadline is December 31, 2020

Board Dates (Results are announced normally one month after the board concludes):

3-6 November 2020

2-5 February 2021

Here is the link to start your Navy ROTC Marine Corps Option Application.

 

Need help with the Navy ROTC Marine Corps Option Scholarship?   We provide full assistance from start to finish with the application!   Please contact us for more details.

 

2020-2021 Navy ROTC Marine Corps Option Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines2020-08-07T03:42:28+00:00

2020-2021 Navy ROTC Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines

Hi Everyone,

The Navy ROTC application deadline is December 31, 2020. All application requirements must be submitted by this date. The following are the 2020-2021 Board Dates for the Navy ROTC Scholarship:

  • 19-23 October 2020
  • 16-20 November 2020
  • 11-14 January 2021
  • 25-29 January 2021
  • 8-11 February 2021
  • 22-26 February 2021
  • 8-11 March 2021
  • 5-8 April 2021
  • 19-22 April 2021

Results from the board dates listed above are announced normally two weeks after the board concludes. As per previous years, they run every couple of weeks from September to April.   Note that some of the listed boards may not be held.

The SAT/ACT is still required for a completed packet.   Scores must be sent to NROTC Test Code 0565.

The Portal Opened on April 1, 2020.

Here is the link to start your Navy ROTC Application.

Use our resources for your application process:

 

ROTC Consulting are experts in helping candidates win the Navy ROTC Scholarship.   Please contact us for more details!

2020-2021 Navy ROTC Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines2020-09-08T14:48:10+00:00

2020-2021 AFROTC Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines

AFROTC Scholarship Deadline

Hi Everyone,

The following are the 2020-2021 Board Dates for Air Force ROTC Scholarship.  As a change from last year, there will be only three boards in October, February and March.

Note that the SAT/ACT is still required for a completed packet.   Scores must be sent to AFROTC Test Code 0548.

The Portal Opened on June 1, 2020.

The application deadline is January 14, 2021.

AFROTC Board Dates

19-23 October 2020

22-26 February 2021

22-26 March 2021

Here is the link to start your Air Force ROTC Application.

 

ROTC Consulting is the premier admissions coaching service helping candidates win the Air Force ROTC Scholarship.   Let our knowledge work for you.   Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

2020-2021 AFROTC Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines2020-08-12T01:52:07+00:00

Seven Essential Reasons You Should Consider NOT Competing on the October Army ROTC Scholarship Board

There a number of great reasons not to compete on the October Army ROTC Board.   For an average candidate, by waiting until January, you will likely increase your chances of receiving a scholarship.  It is important to know you are only boarded once and receive a candidate score on that board.  Even if your application is rolled over to the January board, you carry the October board score with you.  Getting a good score is crucial as it is 25% of your total points.

This advice assumes you do not have a 3.9-4.0 unweighted GPA with 1400 SAT scores with excellent athlete and leader credentials.  If this is you, by all means compete on the October board.  Almost all October boarded winners receive four-year scholarships and 30% of the total four-year scholarship allocation is awarded off the October board.

I sat a scholarship board a few years back and you can read about my observations on a previous blog post.

Reasons to wait:

#1 October Board pool is very competitive.   The October Board often has very good files from those students with high SAT/ACTs and excellent athlete/leader credentials.   If you have a solid but not outstanding file, you will look weaker in relation to these files and your overall board score will be lower than if you competed with less competitive files in January.

#2 October Board traditionally has a low award rate.   The October Board selects about 15% of the overall scholarships.  Most of the scholarships are awarded off the January and March board.  If your file is average, it is highly unlikely you will be selected anyway.  See my past blog post on this subject.

#3 Improve your SAT or ACT Score.   The Board scores are a very important factor in the application.  Army ROTC superscores your Board scores.  If you can significantly improve your scores between October and December, you should hold off competing in October.   See my previous blog post on this.

#4 Improve your Unweighted GPA.  If your high school will increase your GPA after the fall term, especially if it gets you above a 3.0, then you should hold off.   (I have never seen a candidate below a 3.0 unweighted GPA receive a scholarship).

#5 Improve your Fitness Test Score.   The Army ROTC fitness test is 1 minute of push-ups, 1 minute of sit ups and a 1-mile run.   If you can improve your test score with more time , strongly consider waiting until January.  Please listen to my podcast with Navy SEAL Stew Smith on fitness tests and how to improve your scores.

#6 Time to Visit ROTC programs.   You can take time in the fall to visit ROTC programs.  If you find a good fit, you can even decide to do your ROTC interview there on a future visit.

#7 More time to practice the interview.   You can take the fall to practice your interview so you can ace it.   The interview is the most important part of the ROTC application.  Please see my previous post on how to ace the interview.   Also, listen to my podcast with Colonel Lee Reynolds on interview tips and techniques.

Overall, holding off to January gives you more breathing space and more time to put together a strong application file for the January board.  Strongly consider it.

 

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win Army ROTC Scholarships.  Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Seven Essential Reasons You Should Consider NOT Competing on the October Army ROTC Scholarship Board2020-08-09T16:36:31+00:00

2020-2021 Army ROTC Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines

Hi Everyone,

The 2020-2021 Board Dates for Army ROTC have been announced. As per previous years, they are in October, January, and March.

  • The 2021-2022 Army ROTC scholarship deadlines are:
    • 9 October 2020 – board meets 19-23 October 2020
    • 15 January 2021 – board meets 25-29 January 2021
    • 5 March 2021 – board meets 15-19 March 2021
  • All packet items must be completed by these dates to meet the Army ROTC scholarship deadline

Note that the SAT/ACT is still required for a completed packet.

The Portal Opens on June 12, 2020. You must open an application by February 4, 2021 and complete your packet by March 5, 2021 for the last board.

Other Important Dates:

PMS Interviews deadlines are the Friday before the board.

Here is the link to start your Army ROTC Application

For your information, here is a previous blog post I did regarding my observations as an Army ROTC Board Member

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships. Please take a look at our services for more information.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Interested in Service Academies too?

Did you know we also help students win Service Academy appointments? Check out our sister site: Gain Service Academy Admission.
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2020-2021 Army ROTC Scholarship Board Dates and Deadlines2020-09-18T03:16:46+00:00

2020-2021 Application Window Opening Dates for the Army ROTC, Navy ROTC and Air Force ROTC Scholarship

Hi Everyone,

Here opening dates and links for the various services ROTC scholarships applications for school year 2020-2021.

Here are the links for each of the Services:

Navy ROTC:  Open on April 1st.

Air Force ROTC:  Open on June 1st.

Army ROTC:  Open on June 12th.

 

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships.   Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

 

 

2020-2021 Application Window Opening Dates for the Army ROTC, Navy ROTC and Air Force ROTC Scholarship2020-08-09T16:34:01+00:00

COVID-19 impact on 2020-2021 ROTC Scholarship Applicants

The two questions that have been raised by applicants who are rising high school seniors is whether the requirements or timelines will be changed for the SAT/ACT standardized tests and the impact of the cancellation of extracurricular activities (sports, volunteer opportunities, community service) to applicant competitiveness.

Regarding SAT/ACT:

Army, Navy and Air Force is requiring the SAT or ACT. Board dates appear to be on schedule as per previous years.

Regarding extracurricular activities:

ROTC will take into account the challenges students face regarding cancellation of leadership opportunities. There may be additional guidance in the application that allows the applicant to reflect the activities that he/she would have participated in had COVID-19 not caused these cancellations. Many organizations such as Boys/Girls State give credit if you were selected to participate in these programs. The emphasis will be in not penalizing candidate for lack of opportunity.

West Point’s COVID-19 Site for Applicants of the Class of 2025 is very informative. Since all the Service Academies and ROTCs want to march in lockstep regarding these issues, their instructions to candidates will apply to all the Services.

(of course)….we will be sure to continue to update you on this situation!

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships. Please take a look at our services for more information.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Interested in Service Academies too?

Did you know we also help students win Service Academy appointments? Check out our sister site: Gain Service Academy Admission.
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COVID-19 impact on 2020-2021 ROTC Scholarship Applicants2020-09-18T03:09:42+00:00

Why is the October Army ROTC Scholarship Board So Difficult?

Each year we do an initial analysis on the Army ROTC candidates who we advise. We control for most of the other variables as our work with them helps them max out other areas such as activities, essays, and the PT test. They are all similarly prepared by us for the interview. We do everything that we know to give them the best shot at competing.

The only area one cannot control is how well a candidate does in their actual interview and how the interviewer writes it up.

Bottom line most years: We have no “winners” who get below a 29 ACT and a 3.4 GPA. All our “winners” (We put this in quotes because dislike that designation) received four-year scholarships. [We don’t think many (if any) 3-year scholarships were awarded off this first board].

We think ROTC may be holding back some four-year scholarships for the second and possibly third board for candidates who apply late or who will be getting a second look. We don’t know how many–but it does provide some hope for those candidates who “just missed” on this board that they may receive a four-year scholarship in January or possibly March. [For those of you reading this who well below the 29 ACT/3.5 split, a three-year scholarship off the January/March board is probably most likely for you at this point].

Which brings me to an important point of this post—the interview. The interview write-up in particular is read closely by board members and weighs heavily. We have discussed this issue and the interview in general in previous posts.

If you were a candidate who had at or over 30 ACT/1400 SAT with mid 3s GPA or higher and felt you did well in other areas you could control, your interview likely did not go as well as you had hoped or the write up was not strong. [Factors such as a particular activity (class president, student council) designated major, or school choice probably had little or no bearing on your overall selection (or lack thereof)].

Questions you may ask yourself at this point about the interview are the following:

1. Did you visit the program you were interviewing several weeks or months before your interview to learn more about Army ROTC and get to know everyone?

2. Did you get to meet the person who was likely going to interview you?

If your answers to either #1 and #2 was “no,” then you probably could have done a bit more to ensure that your interview was a success.

********

The Army ROTC scholarship process is not perfect. It is certainly better IMHO than the Air Force and Navy scholarship process but there are some things that you can’t control for and even explain sometimes. We continue to learn more every year we do this.

 

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win Army ROTC Scholarships.   Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Why is the October Army ROTC Scholarship Board So Difficult?2020-08-09T16:34:35+00:00

Three Vital Steps to Outstanding ROTC Application Essays

Having sat an Army ROTC scholarship board, conducted hundreds of applicant reviews in my role as a PMS and in discussing applicant essay content with my officer colleagues, I wanted to give you my observations about what makes the best impression on these essays.

What I am referring to the following essays prompts for the Army and Navy ROTC.  I believe these are the most important essays for both applications and is why they are the first essay for both Services:

Army ROTC:

Consider carefully, and then state below in the space provided why you wish to enroll in the Army ROTC Program. Indicate in your statement how you believe your own objectives in life are related to the education and training offered by Army ROTC and what a career obligation means to you.

Navy ROTC:

Discuss your reasons for wanting to become a Naval/Marine Officer. Specifically comment on leadership positions you’ve held, the challenges you have faced and the lessons you have learned. 

I firmly believe that what this essay SHOULD NOT be is a laundry list or rundown of what the applicant achieved in high school or why the applicant believes he/she is an outstanding leader.   The attitude that board members get out of essays such as these are: “Hey, I’m a talented wonderful person and you have to select me because of my past accomplishments.”

But—how can the applicant really say this if they have no idea of what life will be like as a cadet/midshipman and future officer?

What should you do instead?

Three Vital Steps to Outstanding ROTC Application Essays:

#1. Do your research about the service you are interested in, visit your local ROTC unit and talk to cadre and cadets/midshipmen, visit your local national guard or reserve unit and “shadow” an officer for a few hours, and speak to serving or former officers. Learn all you can about what the challenges are in ROTC and what life will be like as a future officer.

#2 Then, when you write your essay, talk about those experiences in your essay. Be humble. Tell the board members you did your due diligence to understand the challenges ahead of you.

#3 Tell them you have prepared yourself as best you can (here you can speak to your past leadership experiences) and feel confident that based on your past leadership and these visits/talks you are up to the task of being an officer candidate and a future military officer.

If you write this type of essay, you will be in the 5% category of those who have gone out of their way to actually validate the statement that they are ready to be an officer candidate.

 

Do you need help with your ROTC application essays and other parts of your ROTC Scholarship application? ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships.   Please schedule a free consultation with us for more information.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

 

Three Vital Steps to Outstanding ROTC Application Essays2020-08-26T02:40:34+00:00

#1 Compelling Reason Why the Interview is King for the Air Force ROTC Scholarship

Panel Board Eliminated – Updated Air Force ROTC Scholarship Requirements

In my contacts and conversations with several folks involved in the Air Force ROTC HSSP for this academic year, I’ve come to learn that the panel board of senior officers (lieutenant colonels and colonels) to select scholarship winners has been eliminated. This used to be 40% of the score of the Air Force ROTC Scholarship Requirements.

What is left is a system that awards almost half of the consideration for the scholarship on the interview conducted at the detachment level (normally performed by a captain). The rest of the points are allocated for GPA, SAT/ACT and the physical fitness assessment.

In short, Air Force ROTC has “powered down” a good deal of the responsibility for selection to the detachment level. What this means is that at least for Air Force HSSP, you better do well on your detachment interview and hope you get a good interviewer who is competent and having a good day. Otherwise, you may be sunk. Please see my post on how to best ace the ROTC Interview.

Overall, you can probably surmise I don’t think this is a good idea. The Navy and Army still have their senior officer panels which serve as a quality check over interviews conducted “in the field.” This board system is needed and I predict the Air Force will go back to it after realizing their error.

 

Do you need help preparing for  your Air Force ROTC interview and other parts of your Air Force ROTC Scholarship application?  We provide full interview preparation to help you ace your interview.  ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win Air Force ROTC Scholarships.  Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

#1 Compelling Reason Why the Interview is King for the Air Force ROTC Scholarship2020-08-09T16:34:52+00:00

Three Vital Reasons for Mock Interview Preparation for ROTC Interviews

I posted a past thread regarding helpful tips from my perspective on how to prepare for either the ROTC scholarship or Service Academy interview.

Three Vital Points:

#1 I have had the pleasure of working with several ROTC scholarship candidates since I retired. I can’t emphasize enough the importance of practicing the candidate interview with a real person–whether it be a parent, relative, or neighbor. If you have an acquaintance who is currently serving or a retired officer in the service component you are applying for and can practice with that person– even better.

#2 Don’t overlook using inexpensive videoconferencing technologies such as skype or zoom in order to connect and practice your interview with the best qualified person.

#3 I’ve found that candidates need about 2-3 one-hour sessions to be ready for their interview. I am always amazed with the improvement I see. Candidates who were hesitant or unsure of themselves at the start were, by the end, confident and eagerly anticipating their actual interview.

The interview counts for too much to leave it to chance. Make sure you do your due diligence and conduct several mock interview sessions. You won’t regret it.

Good luck to everyone as you prepare for the upcoming scholarship year.

 

Do you need help preparing for your ROTC interview and other parts of your ROTC Scholarship application?  We provide full interview preparation to help you ace your interview.  ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win  ROTC Scholarships.  Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Three Vital Reasons for Mock Interview Preparation for ROTC Interviews2020-08-09T16:35:19+00:00

Four Essential Reasons to Ace the SAT or ACT to Win an ROTC Scholarship

After having observed the ROTC scholarship selection process over a six-year period as the PMS of two separate Army ROTC programs, combined with my research on the ROTC selection process for both the Air Force and the Navy, I can’t help remarking about the importance of the SAT/ACT in the overall selection process.

Four Essential Reasons to Ace the SAT or ACT to Win an ROTC Scholarship:

Both the Army and the Air Force give separate and distinct points for SAT/ACT scores. The Army—17% and the Air Force a little over-30%. The Navy does not have a formal point system (from talking with people familiar with the process) but puts great weight in their selection boards on SAT/ACT scores.

#1 All three services conduct a selection board. Having sat an Army ROTC Scholarship Board, (unfortunately or fortunately)- the SAT/ACT is a shortcut used by Army ROTC board members to “rack and stack” candidates. The board counts for 25% for Army ROTC. I go into more detail on my experience sitting such a board in this thread: https://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?threads/observations-of-the-army-rotc-scholarship-board-member.67383/#post-664568

#2 The Navy has no numeric system for their board but ranks SAT/ACT highly.

#3 The Air Force is an exception as their board looks mainly at leadership, “motivation towards the Air Force,” the fitness test, and height/weight. The board score counts for 40% of the overall process. Nevertheless, board members do have access to ACT/SAT scores and from what I understand take them into account.

#4 (the takeaway) Board scores have an outsized influence on scholarship selection. Given that the Services have a superscore or best sitting policy for the SAT/ACT, it is to your advantage to take the test again if you can realistically improve your score. It is also advantageous to take both tests (SAT and ACT) because the highest score or scores from either testing service is used in the final evaluation.

Good luck on your application process and we are here to help!

 

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships.  Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Four Essential Reasons to Ace the SAT or ACT to Win an ROTC Scholarship2020-08-09T16:35:28+00:00

Five Essential Ways to Ace the Army ROTC Board

As a Professor of Military Science at the University of Southern California, I had the opportunity a few years back to sit a scholarship board for Army ROTC at Fort Knox, Kentucky. I wanted to give you my observations about the board in order to understand from one member’s perspective what we are looking for

The Army ROTC board counts for 350 out of 1400 points or about 25% of the overall candidate score. Each board members looks at hundreds of files of candidates on a computer where we see the person’s SAT/ACT scores, interview score and narrative from the Professor of Military Science (or other officer/ROO who interviewed the candidate), GPA and high school transcripts, Civilian Background Experience Form (CBEF) score, physical fitness test scores, and personal essays.

We only have a couple of minutes to look at each candidate file so we didn’t have a great deal of time to spend on each candidate. We were then asked to rank the candidates on a numerical scale.

Here is what I keyed in on when I rated candidates (my observations here are generally in line with my fellow officers who sat these boards with some variation):

ROTC interview narrative. This is the most important element in my opinion. If the interviewing officer gave a strong, well written narrative that recommended a scholarship, I gave this a heavy weighting in my overall rating. I also gave more weight if I knew the interviewer was a PMS. I also looked at the overall interview score.

SAT/ACT. Was (fortunately or unfortunately) a quick way to separate candidates and rank them. Higher the score, the better. Mentally for me, if the candidate had a super score over 1300 it made an impression on me. Same if a candidate could push into the 30s on some ACT sections with a super score of 28 or higher. Obviously, 1400 SAT/30 ACT or higher composite made an even greater impression on me.

Unweighted GPA. Higher the better and another way for me to rank candidates. I took a quick look at the rigor the courses to make sure it was a “legitimate GPA.” I didn’t weight GPA as much as SAT/ACT because of the vast number of different high schools and their differing grading standards.

Athlete, Leader Activities. Quick check of all activities. Tended to look for “vigorous” high school varsity sports that would indicate success in the athletic demands of Army ROTC and significant outstanding leadership accomplishments such as class president and Eagle Scout/Gold Award. I also paid attention if the person had done activities like JROTC, Civil Air Patrol, or Sea Cadets that indicated military propensity. I also noted if the candidate’s parents served in the military (again military propensity).

CBEF and PT Score. Checked briefly to see if it was out of tolerance or there was anything out of the ordinary.

Candidate Essay. Briefly looked at it.

Five Essential Areas to Ace the Army ROTC Board.

#1 The interview is the most important thing to do well on. Prepare for the interview and see my previous advice (andothers on this forum) on what to do to get ready for it: https://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?threads/interview-observation-from-a-former-army-rotc-professor-of-military-science.67205/

#2 A good SAT/ACT score is a way to separate yourself from other candidates. Since the Army ROTC super scores your SAT/ACT, there is nothing to lose to retake the test if you think you can realistically raise the score.

#3 Try to get as high a GPA as you can while ensuring sufficient (but not necessarily extreme) rigor.

#4 Work to make a significant leadership accomplishment in high school that would draw the board members attention away from the “static” of a laundry list of activities. Look to participate in activities like Civil Air Patrol which show a propensity for the military. Listen to my podcast on Civil Air Patrol.

#5 Athletics. Participate in a “vigorous” varsity sport and do your best on the PT test.

I wish you all the best of luck as you prepare for the 2019-2020 application year and future years.

 

Do you need help preparing your application for the ROTC board?  ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships.  Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Five Essential Ways to Ace the Army ROTC Board2020-08-09T16:35:40+00:00

Five Best Tips to Ace the ROTC Interview

After spending six years as a Professor of Military Science (PMS) at two separate Army ROTC programs (Claremont McKenna College and the University of Southern California), I conducted well over 200 PMS interviews. In advising people who come to me now for advice, they ask me what the number one thing to do is in order to be successful in their ROTC interview. [note that this question also is applicable to Academy interviews].

I tell them the most surprising thing for me is how little interviewees know about the ROTC, the Service, and what life will be like as a lieutenant (or ensign). Simple questions I posed such as: Do you know what life will be like as an ROTC cadet? (or) What branch or specialty do you want to serve in? –-was often met with silence, a blank stare, or an answer which showed their lack of knowledge.

So how do you prevent this from happening to you in your future interview?

Top 5 ROTC Interview Tips

1. Visit your local ROTC program well before your interview

Talk to cadre and students who are in the ROTC program. (this helps you answer the interview question about how much you know about ROTC)

2. Do your due diligence

Research what lieutenants or ensigns do in the Service and what the various officer specialties are. The Services websites are great for this and often have videos that you can view on the subject.

3. Visit a local National Guard or Reserve unit

“Shadow” a junior officer for a few hours on a drill weekend. Ask questions about what life is like as an officer and what officers do.

4. Talk to a serving junior officer in the Service you are interested in.

5. Tell the interviewer what you did to become educated.

If you become educated and knowledgeable and do your due diligence, it tells the interviewer that you are serious about becoming an officer. It will impress him or her. You then become the 5% of interview candidates who have adequately prepared in this regard.

Although many tips come to mind, this is one of the most important ROTC interview tips at the top of the list…

Good luck on your future ROTC (and Academy) interviews!

 

Do you need help preparing for your ROTC interview and other parts of your ROTC Scholarship application?  We provide full interview preparation to help you ace your interview.  ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships.  Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point and Air Force Academy!

Five Best Tips to Ace the ROTC Interview2020-09-15T16:01:59+00:00

Five Compelling Reasons to Choose Private Colleges over Public Colleges for ROTC

As a former Army ROTC Professor of Military Science for two “high cost” schools (Claremont McKenna College and the University of Southern California) I am often asked if it is better to take ROTC at a public or private school? In cases where you have an Army, Navy, or certain Air Force ROTC scholarships which pay full tuition, my answer is almost always “a private school.”

The Five Compelling Reasons to Choose a Private School over a Public School for ROTC:

Private Schools:

1. Give you incentives which pay for room and board and/or tuition for the first year of a 3 year scholarship. The “Gold Standard” for ROTC incentives IMHO is the University of Toledo. Maximizing these incentive benefits can amount to over $100,000 in savings over a four year period.

2. Help you gain admission to the school if you have a scholarship “in hand.” Have seen many examples of scholarship recipients getting admission to “reach schools” where otherwise they would not have gained admission without the help of ROTC

3. Have lower student-faculty ratios—students get more individual attention and often times a better educational experience.

4. Allow you to graduate on time so your scholarship benefits don’t run out. Public schools in a number of states are “impacted”—meaning classes are not available which extends the time to graduation

5. Often have nicer facilities for ROTC and greater support from the college administration

Overall, the decision on where to do ROTC is a personal choice and there are sometimes good reasons to select a state supported college or university over a private school. However, in most cases, the better choice is a private school.

 

ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win  ROTC Scholarships.  Our services also provide assistance in selecting the best ROTC programs to align with your interests and goals.   Please contact us for more details.

Please also check out our books available on Amazon on the ROTC Scholarship as well as West Point!

Five Compelling Reasons to Choose Private Colleges over Public Colleges for ROTC2020-08-09T16:35:57+00:00
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